Your Choice: Four for President

Patrick Lawlor, ’12,  Associate Editor in Chief

Patrick Lawlor

Four candidates are running for president of the Student Government Association, the body that approves clubs and organizations and their budgets, and acts on behalf of the students on issues including campus life, dining and information technology, among others.

Each candidate gave speeches on April 11 in the Warrior’s Den, seeking students’ votes in the election that runs from midnight April 12 until April 16.

Rising senior Domenica Fuller was the first to speak. Fuller has served on SGA for only a year, but hopes to institute more SGA office hours and availability for students. She was the only candidate to talk about recycling efforts on campus, and called for motion-sensor lights in classrooms and academic buildings.

“I want to bring what students want,” Fuller added.

The next candidate was the only member of the Class of 2014, Tony Brunco. “If you want things done, I’m your guy,” said Brunco early in his speech.

He has served on SGA since his freshman year, working on the clubs and organization committee and working with Information Technology Services to increase bandwidth on campus. He said he pust the school’s interest above his own, and will be a more accessible president, if elected. He also understands that off-campus housing is a major issue for students.

“There are still bugs to be worked out living off-campus,” said Brunco.

Speaking next was rising senior Haley Warringer, who listed many of her on-campus involvements which include being a resident advisor, an orientation leader, a participant in Alternative Spring Break, and a staff member for conference and events.

“I want every students’ voice heard,” said Warringer. She also pushed for higher meeting attendance at SGA meetings, and wants to add SGA suggestion boxes to high-traffic areas on campus.

A.J. Andreucci, also a member of the Class of 2013, was the final candidate to speak. Andreucci currently serves as the member at large on the SGA executive board. His speech was succinct but powerful. Andreucci’s last point to students was to use their voice and vote in the election.

Voting is open until April 16, and voting can be performed online on Merrimack College’s COIN site, which is accessed through merrimack.collegiatelink.net.

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